Video 4

MASTER COACH TRAINING
Module #6. Teaching the Method

Video Four: Organizing and Teaching Classes
A class is very different from a seminar. When we take a class, we generally expect something that is more structured, has some kind of curriculum, is more specific in terms of learning outcomes and measurable value. As the teacher of a class, therefore, our approach to giving a class should be quite different to just
doing a seminar.

More often than not, a class tends to be something that is ongoing for a few weeks, usually comprising one class per week. Typically, a class might go for six or ten weeks, as with Muss’s one, which we will come to next, and run two or three hours in length per session.
So, let’s assume that you are planning to run a 2-hour Radical Manifestation class for four weeks. You’ve set it up to be run at your local church in one of the classrooms, on a Tuesday night from 7:00 – 9:00.

So, let’s look at some of the logistical questions that you will have in your mind as you plan this class:
• How will I set up the room? Will I do it in theater style or will they need tables and therefore classroom
style?
• Will they need tables to write on, or will clipboards work if it’s in theater style? How many clipboards would
I need? By the way, you can easily make these boards from 1/8″ plywood with a clip attached for very little
cost, but it’s worth it, believe me.
• How many people do I want?
• What is the maximum number for the room?
• What is the minimum number that I want to teach this class?
• What is the maximum number I will feel comfortable teaching?
• What number shall I set an intention to have?
• What equipment will I need? What supplies will I need?
• How much shall I charge for the four weeks? (And by the way, always charge up front for the whole 4
weeks, never per the week. If you do that they might not come for one or two of the weeks because they
might want to save the money. So, always up front.)

• How will I go about attracting the right number of people?
All very good questions that you need to give a lot of consideration to.
And now, here are the academic questions that you will need to address relative to the total 4-weeks program:
• What do I want the participants to have learned by the end of the four weeks?
• How will I know whether or not they have learned those things? Do I test or what kind of assessment — if
any?
• What do I want the participants to have experienced by the end of the four weeks, in the way of the 13-
Steps, or the 4-Steps, or any other tool, worksheets, or whatever?
• How will I know whether they did or did not experience the value of these things?
• What are my own objectives for doing this besides those learning objectives? What do I get out of this?
• How will I know that I have reached these objectives?
• What material do I want to cover in the four-weeks program?
• How will I divide the material over the four weeks?
• What do I want the participants to do in the way of projects over the four weeks? What homework, for
example?
• What resource material, handouts, and so on do I need to prepare to give out?
You will face some of the same questions as you approach each week’s class.
• What do I want the participants to have learned by the end of the class this week?
• How will I know whether or not they have learned those things by the end of the class?
• What do I want the participants to have experienced by the end of the class this week?
• How will I know by the end of the class whether they did or did not experience those things?
• What material do I want to cover in this week’s session?

• What was left over from last week that needs to be covered this week, and what might need to be omitted
in order to make time for it?
• In the light of what happened last week, how much do I need to modify my four-week plan?
You will also need to consider your own teaching style and method.
• How much of my teaching will be by talking and lecturing?
• How many visual aids or diagrams will I use and which ones?
• How much will I use audio/visual media like video or PowerPoint?
• How much discussion will I encourage or make time for?
• How much practical work or exercises?
• Will I tell a story? If so, which one?
• Will I do a meditation or a guided imagery?

Now, once you have a good handle on the answers to your questions, you will have all you need to plan a good program. Time spent in careful planning will pay off, but don’t be inflexible. If what you planned isn’t working, shift gears. And, above all — keep it simple!
In the next module, we’ll take a look at Muss’ 10-week class in Radical Forgiveness.